A New Perspective on Groceries

For this creative lab, I decided to take some photographs of the Whole Foods in Walnut Creek where I work. I wanted to show some views of the store that many people wouldn’t usually see and thus, point of view was the main guideline that I considered when using my camera.

Whole Foods Before Hours

Whole Foods Before Hours

In this first photograph, I used point of view by lowering the camera almost to the ground to make the store loom large. I also kept the rule of thirds in mind horizontally with the colors and vertically using the tree and the arch. There is still some ‘head room’ over the building, even though it doesn’t really have a head. Finally, there are lots of rectangles with some semicircles in the picture that make the architecture look nice.

My favorite kind of parking lot.

Empty Parking Lot. No customers.

This second photo it taken from the other side of the parking lot. It emphasizes the difference the point of view can make on a photograph. If you’ve ever shopped at the Whole Foods in Walnut Creek, you know how crowded this lot is all day, so showing it this empty is a novel view. This photo uses scale to give depth to the photograph. Again, the colors divide the photograph into thirds and the lines from the parking spaces in the foreground lead the eye to look at all the empty space like I intended.

The Aisles from Above

The Aisles from Above

This last photograph is taken from the back offices which have a window that looks out into the store. Although it is the photo that satisfies the fewest of the 10 guidelines for photo composition, it is my favorite. This picture definitely does not keep it simple. There is so much to see in here-aisles, lights, and products on the shelves- but I like that because it reflects on how much goes in to the operation of a grocery store that you probably don’t ever think about despite going in to one probably at least once per week. I guess we can see some shapes appearing in the picture, but the leading lines all lead out of the frame and makes it seem like there is a lot that you are missing out on seeing.

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